Impaired Streams

The City of Goodlettsville and its streams are within the Cheatham Lake/Lower Cumberland Sycamore watershed.

According to the EPA's 303(d) list, the following streams within the City of Goodlettsville are classified as impaired due to either e.Coli contamination (bacteria), siltation (fine layers of dirt on the bottom of the stream which inhibit growth and oxygen levels), and/or habitat alterations (destroying or removing habitat vegetation). The City has in place several Best Management Practices (BMPs) in order to help improve the water's quality with the ultimate goal of removing these water bodies from the EPA's 303(d) list.

Urban land use areas attributes to many sources of water pollution such as stormwater runoff, illicit discharges of sanitary wastes, runoff from the improper disposal of trash, septic systems which leak and are not properly maintained, and animals. Also, impervious areas (i.e., driveways, pavement, rooftops, or areas where the water is absorbed or collected into) allow stormwater runoff to be conveyed to the streams much faster without the water having a chance to filter into the ground. Urban land use within the watershed's impaired stream areas ranges from 1.7% to 68.7%.

Opportunities for improving water quality are protecting existing or restoring vegetation along stream banks, properly caring for lawns, picking up after pets, proper containment during construction activities, etc.


Lumsley Fork


Lumsley Fork enters Goodlettsville from the west near Hitt Lane and Brick Church Pike before it drains into Mansker's Creek. Lumsley Fork suffers from e.Coli contamination and is impaired for 4.7 miles. Lumsley Fork is served by runoff from tributaries, roadways, pavement, commercial and residential land - a mixed urban/agricultural classification.

Madison Creek


Madison Creek enters Goodlettsville on the northeast side and runs adjacent to Madison Creek Road before draining into Mansker's Creek at Moss-Wright Park. Madison Creek's water quality suffers from land development issues. Madison Creek is impaired for 14.4 miles. Madison Creek is served by runoff from tributaries, roadways, pavement, commercial and residential land - a mixed urban/agricultural classification.

Mansker's Creek


Mansker Creek flows into Goodlettsville on the northwest side entering the City at Springfield Highway and Williamson Road. The impaired streams within Goodlettsville (except Dry Creek) drain into Mansker's Creek then Mansker's Creek flows directly into the Cumberland River. Mansker's Creek suffers from e.Coli contamination and land development issues. Mansker's Creek is impaired for 15.5 miles. Mansker's Creek is served by runoff from tributaries, roadways, pavement, commercial and residential land - a mixed urban/agricultural classification.

Slater's Creek

Creek Slaters
Slater's Creek flows from Millersville into Goodlettsville on the north side.  Slater's Creek enters the City near Long Drive and Highway 31W.  According to the EPA, Slater's creek suffers from e.Coli contamination, bank modifications, and sand/gravel/rock discharges from a local rock quarry.  Slater's Creek is impaired for 11.3 miles.  Slater's Creek is served by runoff from tributaries, roadways, pavement, commercial and residential land - a mixed urban/agricultural classification.

Dry Creek


Dry Creek flows from Davidson County into Goodlettsville’s southern corner from the west and runs along some of the City’s southern limits and continues to flow into Davidson County before entering the Cumberland River. Dry Creek is served by runoff from tributaries, roadways, pavement, commercial and residential land - a mixed urban/agricultural classification and drains into the Cumberland River and is impaired by e. Coli and habitat alterations and is impaired for 5.9 miles.

Outfall Inventories and Stream Corridor Assessments

Stream Corridor Assessments
As part of on-going monitoring requirements, the City of Goodlettsville has contracted with Western Kentucky University to conduct stream assessments.

These assessments involve identifying and documenting outfalls (items which channel runoff directly to the stream) and assessments of the stream's corridor.

When documenting outfalls, we look for possible sources of pollutants which can contaminate our waterways. We collect data such as the size, shape and condition of the outfall, if there's continual flow coming from it, and if there are odors, color, or vegetation.

When assessing the stream's corridor, they determine the condition of the stream bank, stream bed, and canopy cover. They also document the condition of the water. This involves obtaining flow rates, color, odor, algae, pH, temperature, and more.

Periodically, testing for e. Coli and sediment is conducted by the State and WKU.


Email us for more information.

Hotline


The stormwater hotline number is (615) 859-2740.
This is the number for the collection of information regarding water quality concerns.
In addition to calling the hotline number to report a violation, you may also complete the Stormwater Violation Reporting Form.