World's Largest Swim Lesson

Goodlettsville Parks and Recreation has cancelled this event for 2020

The World’s Largest Swimming Lesson™, created by the World Waterpark Association in 2010, is a global public relations event supported by aquatic facilities, waterparks, pools, swim schools, YMCA’s, across the country to help the the aquatics industry work together to build awareness about the fundamental importance of teaching children to swim to prevent drowning. Swimming is a life-saving skill for children and a vital tool to prevent drowning, the second leading cause of unintended, injury-related death for U.S. children ages 1-14. Research shows risk of drowning can be reduced by 88 percent if children participate in formal swimming lessons between the ages of 1-4. Yet, a survey conducted by the American Red Cross in 2014 found that more than half of Americans (54 percent) either can’t swim or don’t have all of the basic swimming skills. This CAN and SHOULD change and this is the mission of TEAM WLSL™.

Why this Matters:

The problem is real
Per the Center for Disease Control, drowning remains the leading cause of unintended, injury-related death for U.S. children ages 1-4, and the second leading cause for children under 14; drowning is an even greater threat in other countries around the world.

Many lack basic swimming skills
In 2014, a survey completed by the American Red Cross found that more than half of all Americans (54 percent) either can’t swim or don’t have all of the basic swimming skills.

Parental supervision is key
According to a SafeKids Worldwide 2016 report, despite the fact that lack of supervision plays a role in the majority of drowning deaths, less than half of parents (49 percent) indicate they remain within arms’ reach of their child in the water.

Swimming Lessons Make a Difference
Participation in formal swimming lessons can reduce the risk of drowning among children age 1-4 by up to 88%. According to a recent poll conducted by the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), more than 9 in 10 Americans (95 percent) believe it is important for children to learn how to swim at an early age.